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Wilfred Scawen Blunt

The Two Highwaymen

I LONG have had a quarrel set with Time
Because he robb'd me. Every day of life
Was wrested from me after bitter strife:
I never yet could see the sun go down
But I was angry in my heart, nor hear
The leaves fall in the wind without a tear
Over the dying summer. I have known
No truce with Time nor Time's accomplice, Death.
    The fair world is the witness of a crime
Repeated every hour. For life and breath
Are sweet to all who live; and bitterly
The voices of these robbers of the heath
Sound in each ear and chill the passer-by.
—What have we done to thee, thou monstrous Time?
What have we done to Death that we must die?

 
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About the poet
Wilfred Scawen Blunt
 
By the same poet
Song
The Desolate City
With Esther
To Manon, on his Fortune in loving Her
St. Valentine's Day
Gibraltar
Written at Florence
 
Related books
Wilfred Scawen Blunt at amazon.com


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