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William Wordsworth

The Sonnet

i

NUNS fret not at their convent's narrow room,
    And hermits are contented with their cells,
    And students with their pensive citadels;
Maids at the wheel, the weaver at his loom,
Sit blithe and happy; bees that soar for bloom,
    High as the highest peak of Furness fells,
    Will murmur by the hour in foxglove bells:
In truth the prison unto which we doom
Ourselves no prison is: and hence for me,
    In sundry moods, 'twas pastime to be bound
    Within the Sonnet's scanty plot of ground;
Pleased if some souls (for such there needs must be)
Who have felt the weight of too much liberty,
    Should find brief solace there, as I have found.

 
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About the poet
William Wordsworth
 
By the same poet
Desideria
Upon Westminster Bridge
The Reaper
Daffodils
Lucy (i)
Lucy (ii)
Lucy (iii)
Lucy (iv)
Lucy (v)
Evening on Calais Beach
On the Extinction of the Venetian Republic, 1802
England, 1802 (i)
England, 1802 (ii)
England, 1802 (iii)
England, 1802 (iv)
England, 1802 (v)
Perfect Woman
Ode to Duty
The Rainbow
The Sonnet (ii)
The World
Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood
Valedictory Sonnet to the River Duddon
Mutability
The Trosachs
Speak!
 
Related books
William Wordsworth at amazon.com


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