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Robert Browning

Song from 'Paracelsus'

HEAP cassia, sandal-buds and stripes
    Of labdanum, and aloe-balls,
Smear'd with dull nard an Indian wipes
    From out her hair: such balsam falls
    Down sea-side mountain pedestals,
From tree-tops where tired winds are fain,
Spent with the vast and howling main,
To treasure half their island-gain.

And strew faint sweetness from some old
    Egyptian's fine worm-eaten shroud
Which breaks to dust when once unroll'd;
    Or shredded perfume, like a cloud
    From closet long to quiet vow'd,
With moth'd and dropping arras hung,
Mouldering her lute and books among,
As when a queen, long dead, was young.

 
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About the poet
Robert Browning
 
By the same poet
The Pied Piper of Hamelin
Home Thoughts, from Abroad
Home Thoughts, from the Sea
How they Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix
The Wanderers
Thus the Mayne glideth
Pippa's Song
You'll love Me yet
Porphyria's Lover
Song
Earl Mertoun's Song
In a Gondola
Meeting at Night
Parting at Morning
The Lost Mistress
The Last Ride together
Misconceptions
 
Related books
Robert Browning at amazon.com


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